HRCI & SHRM Pre-Approved Webinar | 2019 Mid-Year Review – Your Compliance Checkup!

Posted June 19, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

Benefits WebinarsJoin us for this HRCI* and SHRM** pre-approved, complimentary, one-hour webinar as our General Counsel and VP of Compliance, Patrick Haynes, reviews the first-half of 2019 and provides a compliance checkup that you won’t want to miss.

Patrick will cover:

  • Changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA)
  • ERISA/Section 125 Best Practices
  • Federal Government’s Approach to Health and Wellness Plans
  • “Working Wounded” – those employees and plan participants that no longer work the ACA-minimum required 30 hours per week, but are still on your plans

Webinar details:

  • Friday, June 28, 2019
  • 12:00pm – 1:00 pm EDT
  • No cost to attend
  • This webinar is open to all HR and Finance Professionals – but not to brokers, agents, TPAs and PEOs

Register Now


*The use of this seal confirms that this activity has met HR Certification Institute’s® (HRCI®) criteria for recertification credit pre-approval.

**AP Benefit Advisors, LLC is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. This program is valid for 1 PDC for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit shrmcertification.org.


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.

Individual Coverage and Extended Benefit HRAs Are in Play for 2020 Plan Start Dates

Posted June 14, 2019 by Patrick Haynes

On June 13, the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor and Treasury issued a final rule that creates two new kinds of Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) – the Individual Coverage HRA (ICHRA) and the Extended Benefit HRA – effective for January 1, 2020 effective dates.

This final ruling is in response to the Trump administration’s October 2017 executive order on healthcare choice and competition.

Individual Coverage HRA

The ICHRA allows employers of all sizes that do not offer a group coverage plan to fund an HRA for employees to buy individual-market insurance, including insurance purchased on the public exchanges formed under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Currently, qualified small-employer HRAs (QSEHRAs) that were created by Congress in December 2016, allow small businesses with less than 50 full-time employees (FTEs) to use pre-tax dollars to reimburse employees who buy non-group health coverage. This ICHRA rule goes even further and doesn’t cap employer contributions. As a result, employers with less than 50 FTEs will have two choices – a QSEHRA or an ICHRA – with some regulatory differences between the two.

The departments posted an FAQ on the new rule that includes a model ICHRA employee notice and attestation form that complies with the new rule’s disclosure provision and aims to explain the type of HRA being offered and communicate that individuals may become ineligible for a premium or tax subsidy when participating in an ACA exchange-based plan.

If employers choose to offer this new ICHRA benefit in 2020, they will need to take action before then, including the required notice for eligible participants. Employees who want to take advantage of an ICHRA in the new year must enroll in an individual health plan during the open enrollment period (unless they have Medicare) that runs between November 1 and December 15, 2019.

Extended Benefit HRA

The Extended Benefit HRA will increase flexibility for employer-sponsored insurance. It can be offered in addition to a traditional group health plan to permit employers to finance up to $1,800 (pre-tax) of additional medical care (such as copays, deductibles, premiums for vision, dental, COBRA and short-term insurance coverage), even if the employee has declined enrollment in the traditional group health plan.

Anticipated Impact

These HRA rules will provide hundreds of thousands of businesses a better way to offer health insurance coverage so that millions of workers and their families can obtain the best coverage for their needs.

The ICHRA will help small employers compete for talent as they have typically faced unaffordable costs that prevent them from offering a traditional group health plan, and, in particular, the Extended Benefit HRA will benefit the growing number of employees who have opted out of their employer’s traditional group health plan because their share is too expensive.

The departments estimate that these HRA rules will help 800,000 employers insure more than 11 million employees and family members of which 800,000 were previously uninsured.

Should you have additional questions or comments, please contact your Sales Executive or Account Manager.  Thank you.

Links

ACA Limits, Penalties and Fees – 2014-2019

Posted June 14, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

Employer Shared Responsibility (Employer Mandate)

Plan Years 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014
Affordability Safe Harbor Percentage 9.86% 9.56% 9.69% 9.66% 9.56% 9.50%

Employer Mandate Penalties – Calendar Year

Penalties 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014
Tier One: Failure to offer coverage or to offer to 95% of employees (70% for 2015) $2,500 $2,320 $2,260 $2,160 $2,080 $2,000
Tier Two: Failure to offer coverage that is affordable and meets minimum value $3,750 $3,480 $3,390 $3,240 $3,120 $3,000

Market Rules

Account Limits 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014
Health Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) $2,700 $2,650 $2,600 $2,550 $2,550 $2,500
Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $5,000
Health Spending Accounts (HSA)
High Deductible Health Plan Annual Deductible Minimums (Self-Only/Family) $1,350
$2,700
$1,350
$2,700
$1,300
$2,600
$1,300
$2,600
$1,300
$2,600
$1,250
$2,500
Annual Out-of-Pocket Maximums (Self-Only/Family) $6,750
$13,500
$6,650
$13,300
$6,550
$13,100
$6,550
$13,100
$6,450
$12,900
$6,350
$12,700
Maximum Contribution (Self-Only/Family) $3,500
$7,000
$3,450
$6,850/$6,900
$3,400
$6,750
$3,350
$6,750
$3,350
$6,650
$3,300
$6,550
Transportation
Parking (per month) $265 $260 $255 $255 $250 $250
Mass Transit (per month) $265 $260 $255 $255 $250 $130

Fees – Paid by Health Plan (per Covered Life)

Fees 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014
Transitional Reinsurance Fee N/A N/A $0 $27.00 $44.00 $63.00
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCORI)
Plan Years Ending 1/1 – 9/30 $2.45 $2.39 $2.26 $2.17 $2.08 $2.00
Plan Years Ending 10/1 – 12/31 N/A $2.45 $2.39 $2.26 $2.17 $2.08

Please contact your AssuredPartners’ Sales Executive or Account Manager for any further questions or assistance.


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.

IRS Releases 2020 Limits for HSAs

Posted May 28, 2019 by Patrick Haynes

On May 28, 2019, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2019-25 It provides the 2020 inflation-adjusted amounts for HSA-qualified high deductible health plans (HDHPs).

The inflation-adjusted increases for 2020 are:

  • HSA-Qualified HDHP Self Coverage: Annual deductible must be $1,400 or more in 2020 (up $50 from 2019), and annual out-of-pocket expenses cannot exceed $6,900 (up $150 from 2019).
  • HSA Contribution Limit for Self Coverage: Increases to $3,550 in 2020, up $50 from 2019.
  • HSA-Qualified HDHP Family Coverage: Annual deductible must be $2,800 or more in 2020, up $100 from 2019, and annual out-of-pocket expenses cannot exceed $13,800 (up $300 from 2019).
  • HSA Contribution Limit for Family Coverage: Increases to $7,100 in 2020, up $100 from 2019.
  • No change to the Age-55+ HSA catch-up limit.  That value remains at $1,000 per year.

Please contact your Sales Executive or Account Manager for additional details about how this may affect your 2020 HDHP-HSA offerings.    And, don’t forget to review our 2020 non-HDHP plan limits here.

Contribution and Out-of-Pocket Limits
for Health Savings Accounts and High-Deductible Health Plans
2020 2019 Change
HSA contribution limit (Employer + Employee) Self-only: $3,550
Family: $7,100
Self-only: $3,500
Family: $7,000
Self-only: +$50
Family: +$100
HSA catch-up contributions (age 55 or older) $1,000 $1,000 No change
HDHP minimum deductibles Self-only: $1,400
Family: $2,800
Self-only: $1,350
Family: $2,700
Self-only: +$50
Family: +100
HDHP maximum out-of-pocket amounts (deductibles, co-payments and other amounts, but not premiums) Self-only: $6,900
Family: $13,800
Self-only: $6,750
Family: $13,500
Self-only: +$150
Family: +$300

Links:

HRCI & SHRM Pre-Approved Webinar | Association Health Plans – Is There a Pathway Forward?

Posted May 21, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

For supporters of “Association Health Plans (AHPs),” it has been a year-and-a-half roller coaster. It all started with excitement over President Trump’s Executive Order in October 2017, culminating in proposed Department of Labor (DOL) regulations issued in January 2018. Once the DOL regulations were finalized in June 2018, a good number of organizations immediately took steps to establish AHPs in accordance with the final rules (known as Pathway #2 AHPs), which kicked off coverage starting January 1, 2019. All was going well in the AHP-world!

Enter stage left…a DC District Court ruling invalidating the final AHP regulations on March 28. In the wake of District Court ruling, the AHP-world has crumbled, aided by the Department of Justice’s (DOJ’s) decision not to request a “stay” of the ruling, which prompted the DOL to issue guidance informing existing Pathway #2 AHPs that they cannot expand their coverage to new participants, and existing participants may not re-enroll in their AHP plan for the 2020 coverage year. The DC Circuit Court of Appeals is not scheduled to uphold or overturn the District Court ruling in September or October of this year, with the Supreme Court’s consideration waiting in the wings. Meanwhile, AHPs that are formed under the DOL’s guidance issued prior to the release of the final AHP regulations (referred to as Pathway #1 AHPs) are unaffected by the District Court ruling, which means Pathway #1 AHPs can still be formed in most States with the State’s permission.

Join us for this HRCI* and SHRM** pre-approved, complimentary, one-hour webinar as Christopher E. Condeluci, Principal and Sole Shareholder of CC Law & Policy, discusses in-depth about Pathway #1 and Pathway #2 AHPs, the DOL’s recent non-enforcement and Pathway #1 clarifying guidance, recent State activity, and the DC Circuit Court’s review of the District Court ruling.

Webinar details:

  • Thursday, May 30, 2019
  • 2:00pm – 3:00 pm EDT
  • No cost to attend
  • This webinar is open to all HR and Finance Professionals – but not to brokers, agents, TPAs and PEOs

Register Now


*The use of this seal confirms that this activity has met HR Certification Institute’s® (HRCI®) criteria for recertification credit pre-approval.

**AP Benefit Advisors, LLC is recognized by SHRM to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. This program is valid for 1 PDC for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit shrmcertification.org.


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.

Reminder: PCORI Fees Last Installment Due this July*

Posted May 17, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

*Note-this is the final year for 2018 calendar year plans.  Plans that end between Jan 1, 2019 and October 1, 2019 will owe again, next year.  Please see our multi-year reference chart here.

Applies to: Self-Insured Health Plans, including HRAs & FSAs

Employers who sponsor self-insured health plans must pay their annual Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) fees by July 31.

PCORI fees are reported and paid annually using IRS Form 720 (Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return). The applicable PCORI fee you pay each July is based on when your plan year ended.

  • $2.26 for plan years ending between January 1, 2017 – September 30, 2017
  • $2.39 for plan years ending between October 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017
  • $2.45 for plan years ending on/after October 1, 2018, but before October 1, 2019
  • Please see our multi-year reference chart here

As a reminder, the PCORI fees are based on the average number of covered lives under the plan or policy. This ordinarily includes employees and their enrolled spouses and dependents. Individuals who are receiving continuation coverage (such as COBRA coverage) must also be included in the number of covered lives under the plan in calculating the fee. Plan sponsors of self-insured health plans must use one of the following three methods to determine the average number of lives covered under a plan for the plan year:

  1. Actual Count Method – A plan sponsor may determine the average number of lives covered under a plan for a plan year by adding the totals of lives covered for each day of the plan year and dividing that total by the total number of days in the plan year.
  2. Snapshot Method – A plan sponsor may determine the average number of lives covered under an applicable self-insured health plan for a plan year based on the total number of lives covered on one date (or more dates, if an equal number of dates is used in each quarter) during the first, second or third month of each quarter, and dividing that total by the number of dates on which a count was made.
  3. Form 5500 Method – An eligible plan sponsor may determine the average number of lives covered under a plan for a plan year based on the number of participants reported on the Form 5500, Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan, or the Form 5500-SF, Short Form Annual Return/Report of Small Employee Benefit Plan.

HRAs and Health FSAs
Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) and health Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) are not completely excluded from the obligation to pay PCORI fees. However, two special rules apply for plan sponsors that provide an HRA or health FSA. Under these special rules:

  1. If a plan sponsor maintains only an HRA or health FSA (and no other applicable self-insured health plan), the plan sponsor may treat each participant’s account as covering a single life. This means that the plan sponsor is not required to count spouses or other dependents.
  2. An HRA is not subject to a separate research fee if it is integrated with another self-insured plan providing major medical coverage, provided the HRA and the plan are established and maintained by the same plan sponsor and have the same plan year. This rule allows the sponsor to pay the PCORI fee only once with respect to each life covered under the HRA and other plan. However, if an HRA is integrated with an insured group health plan, the plan sponsor of the HRA and the issuer of the insured plan will both be subject to the research fees, even though the HRA and insured group health plan are maintained by the same plan sponsor.

The same analysis applies to health FSAs that do not qualify as excepted benefits.

Please contact your AssuredPartners’ Sales Executive or Account Manager for any further questions or assistance. 

Please see the following IRS resources for more information on the ACA’s PCORI Fees:
IRS Notice 2018-85 (released 11/5/2018)
Final Regulations on the PCORI Fees
PCORI Fee Overview Page
PCORI Fee: Questions and Answers
IRS Form 720 and Instructions
PCORI Fee Due Dates and Applicable Rates
Chart of Health Coverage and Arrangements Subject to PCORI Fee
AP Benefit Advisors’ Multi-Year PCORI Fee Reference Chart


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.

Is Transparency Coming to Big Pharma? More after these messages…

Posted May 15, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

Author: Scott Mayer, Director of Data Analytics at AP Benefit Advisors

HHS Secretary, Alex Azar, informed the public this week that starting sometime during the summer of 2019, pharmaceutical companies will have to include pricing information in their television advertisements. This rule applies for any medication where the manufacturer set pricing is greater than $35 for one-month’s supply.

Johnson & Johnson has even been proactive, complying with the regulations on ads for their brand drug “Xarleto” starting this year. Here’s what their advertisement looks like: https://www.ispot.tv/ad/IXmo/xarelto-selective-cost

If this advertisement is any indication, then the new regulations will prove to be much ado about nothing. Just examine the image from the advertisement that includes the pricing disclosure and you will see why:

First and foremost, looking at this screen, is there really an indication of the cost of the medication to a specific member? The list price apparently is $448, yet most patients will pay between $0 and $47? What’s the difference and what’s my cost? That depends on my PBM arrangement, my plan design, my pharmacy or specialty pharmacy, possibly my provider, etc. There are so many variables and the manufacturers will be able to exploit this intentional opacity to provide no real clarity or insight into medication costs for the consumer.

Now take a look at Xarelto claims from a one-week period in AP Benefit Advisors’ book of business:

The ingredient costs are very much in line with the $448 disclosed in the advertisement, but member-paid amounts range from as low as $0 to as high as $441.47. The fact is, much like hospitals being required to publish their “chargemasters,” this disclosure of information is essentially worthless to the consumer with no additional context.

Hopefully, disclosing the list pricing will give the public some insight into the “true” cost of some of these medications compared to their actual out-of-pocket expenses. This may work to enhance the value perception that people have when it comes to their prescription drug benefits. And yes, perhaps this information will foster a growing push to come up with ways to better manage and possibly regulate prescription drug pricing practices. However, it is also possible that these disclosures will end up being just like the fast talk, ignored, unintelligible disclosures that we hear after car ads, financial planning ads, and so many others where we have already tuned out waiting for the TV program to resume.

Source: Scott Mayer | Is Transparency Coming to Big Pharma? More after these messages…


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.

HHS 2020 Benefit Limits and Updates

Posted May 9, 2019 by Patrick Haynes

HHS 2020 Benefit Limits and Updates

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released final regulations with the benefit and payment parameters for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2020, along with a few other insurance market and Exchange-related final regulations. Although largely aimed at insurers and state regulators, the regulations include provisions of interest to employers and their advisors. Here are two key highlights.

A.  Annual Cost-Sharing Limits. HHS has increased the maximum annual limitation on cost-sharing for 2020 to $8,150 for self-only coverage and $16,300 for other than self-only coverage (up from $7,900 and $15,800 for 2019).

HHS finalized a proposed change to the way it calculates this adjustment that takes into account increases in individual health insurance premiums, acknowledging that the change will result in higher cost-sharing limits. The final limits for 2020 are less than the proposed limits because data inputs used in the formula were updated after publication of the proposed regulations. This formula also affects adjustments to employer shared responsibility penalties under Code § 4980H.

B. Generic Drugs.Health plans are not required to count drug manufacturer coupons toward the annual limit on cost-sharing when a medically appropriate generic equivalent is available.

  • However, HHS declined to finalize a proposal that would have allowed plans that cover both a brand-name prescription drug and its generic equivalent to consider the brand-name drug to not be an essential health benefit.
  • Also not finalized was a proposal to create an exception to the prohibition on midyear coverage modifications that would have allowed midyear prescription-drug formulary changes.
  • Note: The provision on coupons is intended to discourage providers and patients from choosing expensive brand-name drugs when a less expensive and equally effective alternative is available.

There were additional updates about the Exchange & SHOP Enrollment and the so-called “Silver Loading” – a state-level practice that allows insurers to increase premiums on silver-level Exchange plans to compensate for reduced federal reimbursements.  Those details can be found in the Fact Sheet linked below.

Links:

Employee Benefit – New Jersey Updates – Mandates, Reporting & Transit

Posted May 9, 2019 by Patrick Haynes

The Garden State has indeed been busy.  Here’s what you need to know.

Individual Mandate in NJ: 

  • It is identical to the federal requirement—and NJ created it to make a state-based penalty for NJ Taxpayers that don’t have coverage.  Just like taxpayers in Massachusetts, NJ taxpayers will have to have health coverage or pay the applicable tax (fine).
  • Should the federal government and/or the current administration succeed with repealing the Affordable Care Act, the NJ and MA state-level-individual mandates would still be in place.
  • Details about the Shared-Responsibility Payments can be found here.

Employer Mandate in NJ:

Transportation in NJ:

  • Employers with 20 or more NJ employees need to offer employees the ability to defer pre-tax monies under a Section 132 plan.  Fines begin in 2020 and will be $250/qtr.

For more details on the last update, please continue reading.

 

NJ Pre-Tax Transit Plans Now a Must

Federal Background:  Qualified transportation fringe benefits under Section 132(f) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC)  allow an employer to provide commuter and transit benefits to their employees that are tax-free up to a certain limit. This employer-provided voluntary benefits program allows employees to effectively reduce their monthly commuting or transit costs. In 2019, the monthly limit is $265 for any commuter benefit or transit pass. While such benefits provide a tax benefits to employees, under the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, employers are no longer allowed a federal income tax deduction for qualified transportation fringe benefits. The Act also requires tax-exempt employers to pay unrelated business income taxes on such benefits.

Garden State Action: On Friday, March 1, 2019, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed S1567 into law, requiring certain employers to offer a pre-tax transportation fringe benefit to their employees. New Jersey employers with at least 20 employees will be required to offer this benefit to employees who are not currently in a collective bargaining agreement.

It appears that “covered employers” means employers with at least 20 employees, regardless of whether they all work in the State of New Jersey; however, clarification from the regulators on this would be helpful.

“Many residents of New Jersey use mass transit or other forms of transportation to commute daily to and from work,” said Governor Murphy. “Providing this pre-tax benefit to commuters throughout our state will reduce the financial burden of fares and parking costs, resulting in significant savings. By signing this bill, my Administration is taking another step toward creating the fairer and more customer-friendly transportation system that our commuters deserve.”

An employee under the new law is identified as anyone hired or employed by the employer and who reports to the employer’s work location, and mirrors the definition used in the unemployment compensation law. Certain temporary or limited exceptions exist for employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement and those employed by the federal government.

Some of the details regarding implementation of the program are still outstanding and the Commission of Labor and Workforce Development will adopt rules and regulations concerning the administration and enforcement of the benefit.

A pre-tax benefit will allow an employee to set aside a certain portion of pre-taxed wages, which could be made available for specified transportation services while reducing the employee’s federal taxable income.

The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce will adopt rules and regulations concerning the administration and enforcement of the pre-tax benefit.  Civil penalties will apply for non-compliance with this new law. For the first violation, the penalty is not less than $100 and not more than $250. An employer has 90 days from the date of the violation to offer the pre-tax transportation fringe benefit program before the civil penalty is imposed.  After 90 days, each additional 30 day period in which an employer fails to offer a pre-tax transportation fringe benefit is a subsequent violation subject to a $250 civil penalty.  The civil penalty is to be imposed only once in any 30 day period.  The Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development is required to ensure that eligible employers provide the pre-tax transportation fringe benefit and is authorized to issue citations for noncompliance.

When does this take effect?

While the ordinance takes effect immediately, it will not be enforced until final rules and regulations are released. The earliest enforcement is anticipated to be March 1, 2020, but is subject to change. Employers should determine whether their current employee demographic would require these benefits to be offered to their employees. Employers currently offering transportation fringe benefits to employees should review their current program to ensure compliance with the final rules and regulations in New Jersey once those are released.

Links:

EEOC’s Breakdown of Workplace Discrimination in FY 2018

Posted May 1, 2019 by Megan DiMartino

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released a detailed breakdown of the 76,418 charges of workplace discrimination they received in the fiscal year (FY) 2018, which ended September 30, 2018. The EEOC posted the breakdown of charges by state on their website.

The EEOC’s numbers for FY 2018*:

  • 90,558 charges of discrimination resolved
  • $505 million secured for victims in the private sector, state and local government, and federal workplaces
  • 19.5% reduction in the agency’s charge workload (achieved through deploying new strategies to more efficiently prioritize charges with merit, more quickly resolve investigations, and improve the agency’s digital systems)
  • 519,000 calls to the agency’s toll-free number
  • 34,600 emails
  • 200,000+ inquiries in field offices

“The EEOC had a remarkable year working on behalf of those who came to the agency having experienced discrimination in their workplaces, ” said EEOC Acting Chair, Victoria A. Lipnic. Also adding, “Our fiscal year 2018 final statistics reflect significant recoveries for individuals through our administrative enforcement and our litigation program. The statistics also indicate the EEOC has been handling its workload in a more efficient manner, expanding tools to provide better timelier service to the public while sharpening our focus on meritorious charges and those that advance the public interest.”

The EEOC’s breakdown of charge numbers for FY 2018*:

  • Retaliation: 39,469 (51.6% of all charges filed)
  • Sex: 24,655 (32.3%)
  • Disability: 24,605 (32.2%)
  • Race: 24,600 (32.2%)
  • Age: 16,911 (22.1%)
  • Sexual Harassment: 7,609 (13.6% increase from FY 2017, and $56.6 million in monetary benefits for the victims)
  • National Origin: 7,106 (9.3%)
  • Color: 3,166 (4.1%)
  • Religion: 2,859 (3.7%)
  • Equal Pay Act: 1,066 (1.4%)
  • Genetic Information: 220 (0.3%)

*These numbers and percentages add up to more than the charges filed and more than 100 percent because some charges allege multiple bases.

Source: EEOC | EEOC Releases Fiscal Year 2018 Enforcement and Litigation Data

Links:


For more information, contact info@apbenefitadvisors.com. The information contained in this post, and any attachments, is not intended and should not be misconstrued as legal advice. You should contact your employment, benefits or ERISA attorney for legal direction.

AP Benefit Advisors’ webinar and website resources are designed for U.S.-based organizations. Our privacy and GDPR policy should be reviewed here. Please opt-out if you do not agree to these terms and conditions.